smartfilming

Exploring the possibilities of video production with smartphones

#25 Transferring big (video) files wirelessly between Android and iOS with mobile apps — 12. June 2020

#25 Transferring big (video) files wirelessly between Android and iOS with mobile apps

One of the most fascinating and convenient things about a good modern smartphone is that it lets you do a whole video production workflow involving capturing, editing and publishing on a single device, thereby offering the opportunity to eliminate the tedious but usually mandatory process of having to transfer media files between several devices to get all this done. Depending on the situation however, there’s still a certain need for file transfer solutions. You might be shooting on a phone but want to edit on a tablet with a larger screen, someone else could be the one editing your captured footage or you want to receive footage from another person to incorporate into your phone edit. Of course, nowadays, we want everything to be wireless if possible.

Both major mobile platforms, Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android include the option to wirelessly transfer files to another (nearby) device running the same operating system, using Bluetooth for the devices to find and connect to each other and a WiFi protocol for the actual transfer – no internet connection required! Apple provides the easier and more straight-forward way with its AirDrop feature baked right into the OS while Google requires you (and the receiver) to install its Files by Google app (they also seem to be working on an AirDrop equivalent called “Nearby Sharing” that could launch with the next official version of Android, Android 11). Things get a bit more complicated however if you want to transfer files between the two platforms. Don’t despair though, you do have options depending on what kind of transfer method you prefer.

There are basically four different ways: cloud, temp cloud, device-to-device with internet and device-to-device without internet. You will need an active internet connection for the first three options, you won’t need one for the fourth.

Cloud

I’m sure most of us are pretty familiar with some kind of cloud storage service: Dropbox, Google Drive, iCloud, Microsoft OneDrive, Box etc. You can upload files to a cloud server and access/download them from anywhere, anywhere with an internet connection that is. The good thing is that no matter what mobile platform you are on, you already have some free cloud storage at your fingertips: Google gives you 15GB of free cloud storage on Google Drive and unless you are rocking a very recent Huawei phone, using an Android device basically means you already have a Google account and Google Drive pre-installed on your phone. Apple is a bit more stingy and gives you only 5GB of free iCloud storage. And even if we ignore the amount of free storage, Google Drive is the better cross-platform choice because it’s also available for iOS while there’s no iCloud app for Android. All other major cloud storage solutions including Dropbox, Microsoft OneDrive or Box have apps for both Android and iOS, so no problem there. Another somewhat uncommon choice could be the messenger app Telegram. As I pointed out in my last blog post, Telegram gives you unlimited cloud storage for free. However, while the maximum file size of 1.5GB per file is huge compared to what you can send with other messenger apps, it can’t compete with dedicated cloud storage services in this regard, Google Drive and Dropbox for instance have no file size limit at all, OneDrive recently expanded from 15 to 100GB per file which should cover most common use cases. Generally, you should be aware of the fact that unlike with the device-to-device solutions mentioned later on, the file is not transferred directly to the other device’s storage. Once it’s been uploaded into the cloud from device A, device B needs to download it from there if you (or another person) want(s) to work with it. If you/someone else are/is not using the same cloud service account on both devices this involves the sharing of a download link. Things to consider here are also the available upload/download speed and the consumption of data if you are using mobile internet. Uploading/downloading big video files via mobile data can wreak havoc on your data plan – at least in certain countries… So better make sure you’re connected to a fast wifi network. All mentioned services send files in their original quality without compression as far as I could see.

Temp Cloud

I don’t think “temp cloud” is an actual term but I was looking for a word to describe file transfer services that allow you to temporarily store something in their cloud and create a shareable download link but where the file will be automatically deleted after a short period of time. The most popular service like that on the web is probably WeTransfer. They used to have mobile apps for Android and iOS as well but they discontinued them some time ago, replacing them with an app called Collect. The all-new UI and different structure have generated a lot of backlash from WeTransfer fans though. While it’s true that the whole “Boards” layout can be confusing, one can get the same transfer job done with Collect adding files to a “Board” within the app and then sharing the “Board” with a download link which expires automatically within 90 days. And that’s not all, unlike with the web service there’s no file size limit! In case Collect remains a mystery to you, WeTransfer is still available as a web service with the option to send files of up to 2GB in the free version (20GB in the paid pro version). If you want to send your files encrypted for security reasons, you should have a look at an offering from Mozilla’s popular Firefox brand: Firefox Send. You can send files with up to 1GB and an expiration time of one day without creating a free account, up to 2.5GB and an expiration time of seven days with a free account. It’s still in beta and only available as a mobile app on Android, you can however access the service on iOS as well via a web browser. A popular choice for all kinds of file transfers is Send Anywhere (which will pop up again in the coming paragraphs). While I mostly use Send Anywhere for device-to-device file transfer, they also have the option to send files via temp cloud / download link. You will however have to create a (free) account with them to use this feature. File size limit is 10GB for the free account, 50GB for the paid Plus account. Send Anywhere sports excellent mobile apps for both Android and iOS. Another service that I just recently discovered is the Norwegian company Filemail which also has mobile apps for both Android and iOS. Their file size allowance is huge, a whopping 50GB, but the free version only lets you do two transfers a day. Still a pretty cool option so you should give it a go! You can choose either one day or seven days for the link to expire. All mentioned services send files in their original quality without compression as far as I could see.

Device-to-Device with internet

If you don’t want to use a service that stores your files on an external cloud server but prefer a direct transfer between two devices, Send Anywhere is a good choice again. Do note that despite the fact that I’m talking about device-to-device transfer, you will need an internet connection and it will use up data if you’re on mobile internet. Transfer speeds depend on the upload/download speed available. Unlike the two cloud solutions with a download link, this way is particularly useful if the device you want to transfer to is right next to you and the file will be used right away. Both devices need to have Send Anywhere installed and open, unless you want to use their web service via a browser which has a file size limitation. After selecting the files you want to send, the sending device will generate a 6-digit key which needs to be entered on the receiving device within a time frame of 10 minutes to initiate the transfer. While there is no file size limit, do make sure that the receiving device has enough free storage available! With Feem there’s another good choice available for Android and iOS. It’s the same principle but works slightly differently from Send Anywhere: After opening the app on both devices, they should detect each other (in the free version the app automatically assigns silly nicknames like “Lonely Gecko” or “Reckless Chicken” to the devices). You then tap on the listed device you want to send files to, choose “Send File” and select the files you want to send, finally tapping the “send” button. Important note: Unlike Send Anywhere (which can also utilize mobile data), Feem only works if both devices are connected to the same WiFi network! Feem is free to use. It has a paid pro version (annual subscription of 4.99 Euro/US-Dollar) which gives you a whole bunch of customization options for the device name, avatar, download folder but nothing really essential. All mentioned services send files in their original quality without compression as far as I could see. 

Device-to-Device without internet

Unlike with all the aforementioned options, Feem also has the ability to work across platforms without an active internet connection which makes it pretty unique and a lifesaver for certain situations! While Send Anywhere has an option to share files device-to-device without the use of an active internet connection via the WiFi Direct protocol, this is only available between Android devices as iOS doesn’t support the standard, so I will have to exclude it here for the purpose of this article. The magic trick in Feem is done by the Android device creating a local WiFi network to which the iOS device can connect (it doesn’t work the other way round but that’s not really a problem). Feem gives you a pretty good step-by-step guide how to do this upon opening the app so I won’t get into the details here (it’s not that complicated, don’t worry!) but you basically switch on the “Turn on Wi-Fi Direct” button in the app and a pop-up with the hotspot name and password appears which you then use to connect your iPhone or iPad to this network and commence with your file transfer from within the app. This is a great feature which you can either use if there’s no internet available at all or you don’t want to use up data. The app is not 100% stable all the time so you might have to redo a transfer on occasion but in general I have found it to work quite well.

One final note: With many/most services you will also be able to send a file using their app without having to open the app first. You can locate a video file in the Gallery (Android) or Camera Roll (iOS) and then use the OS’s share sheet to send the selected file using the file transfer app of your choice.

I’m sure there are many other options out there so this article is by no means a complete overview but just a highly personal selection of available choices that I deem worth checking out. Feel free to drop comments and questions here or hit me up on the Twitter @smartfilming. You can also sign up for my Telegram channel t.me/smartfilming

Download Google Drive for Android or iOS
Download Microsoft OneDrive for Android or iOS
Download Dropbox for Android or iOS
Download Telegram for Android or iOS
Download Collect for Android or iOS
Download Firefox Send for Android
Download Send Anywhere for Android or iOS
Download Filemail for Android or iOS
Download Feem for Android or iOS

#24 Why Telegram is the best messenger app for mobile video production — 7. June 2020

#24 Why Telegram is the best messenger app for mobile video production

Ever since smartphones and mobile internet became a thing, messenger apps have grown immensely in popularity and significantly curbed other types of (digital) communication like SMS/texts, eMails and heck yes, phone calls, for most of us. There’s also little doubt about which messenger apps can usually be found on everyone’s phone: WhatsApp is by far the most popular app of its kind on a global scale with only Facebook Messenger being somewhat close in terms of users. Sure, if you look at certain regions/countries or age groups you will find other prominent messenger apps like WeChat in China, KakaoTalk in Korea, Viber in the Ukraine or Snapchat among the younger generation(s). We have also seen a noticeable rise in the popularity of security and data conscious alternatives like the Edward Snowden-recommended Signal or Switzerland-based Threema. One might say that right in between mass popularity and special focus groups sits Telegram.

Telegram started out in 2013, founded by Russian brothers Nikolai and Pawel Durow who had already created “Russia’s Facebook”, VK. While it was able to avoid being seen as “the Kremlin messenger”, its claims of providing an experience that is very strong in terms of security and data protection have received some flak from experts. It also came into questionable spotlight as the preferred modus communicandi of the so-called “Islamic State” and other extremist groups that want to avoid scrutiny from intelligence agencies. But this is just some general context and everyone can decide for herself/himself what to make of it.

The reason for this article has nothing to do with the aforementioned “historical” context but looks only at the app’s potentially useful functionality when it comes to media production, particularly video production. People are sending enormous amounts of video these days via their messenger apps. For reasons benefitting the sender/receiver as well as the app service provider itself, those videos are usually compressed, both in terms of resolution and bitrate. The compression results in smaller file sizes which lets you send/receive them faster, use up less storage space and avoid burning through too much mobile data. This works pretty well when all you do is watch the video in your messenger app, it’s far from ideal however if you want to work with the video somebody sent you.

While there is a way to prevent the app from automatically compressing your video by sending/attaching it not as a video (which is the usual way of doing it) but as a file (as you would normally add a doc or pdf), the file size limit of most messenger apps is so small that it’s not really suitable for sending video files that are longer than one minute. WhatsApp has a current file size limit of 100MB and so does Signal. Threema tops out at 50MB for sending files uncompressed while Facebook Messenger gives you a measly 25MB! Just for measure: a moderate bitrate of 16Mbit/s for a FHD 1920×1080 video will reach the 100MB limit at only 50 seconds. In this regard, Telegram is basically lightyears ahead of the competition as it lets you send uncompressed files up to 2 GB (around 2000 MB), yes you heard that right! 

Choose “File” and then “Gallery” (or another option if that’s where your media is located) to send a video in full quality without compression.

To send an uncompressed video file within Telegram, tap on the paper clip icon in a chat, select “File” (NOT “Gallery”) and then “Gallery. To send images without compression” (or choose one of the other options if your video file is located somewhere else on the device). It’s that easy! There’s also a cool way to use Telegram as your personal unlimited cloud storage: If you open the app’s menu (tapping on the three lines in the top left corner) you will find an option that says “Saved Messages”. This is basically your own personal space within the app where you can collect all kinds of material like notes, links or files. As long as the file doesn’t exceed 2 GB, you can upload it into this “self chat” like you would in a regular cloud storage service like Dropbox, GoogleDrive or OneDrive. And believe it or not, you currently get UNLIMITED storage for free! I think there’s a chance that Telegram might cap this at some point in the future if people start using it too excessively but up until then, this is a pretty amazing feature most users don’t know about (even I didn’t until a few days ago!).

Telegram gives you unlimited cloud storage, each file you upload can be up to 1.5GB in size.

This benefit gets even more powerful when you consider that you can use Telegram across several devices (it’s not only available for Android, iOS and Windows 10 Mobile but also has desktop apps for Windows and MacOS!) with the same account, something you can’t do with other messengers like WhatsApp which ties you to a single mobile device for active use of one account. A side note though: If you have someone send you a big uncompressed video file over mobile data, you might want to tell the other person that it will cut into their mobile data significantly. So if possible, they should send it when logged into a WiFi network.

In-app video editor of Telegram.

And even if your goal is actually to compress a video when sending it, Telegram gives you the best choices to do so. When selecting a video via the Gallery button (instead of the File button) you can adjust the resolution of the clip by using the app’s recently updated in-app video editor. After marking your clip of choice by tapping on the empty circle in the top right corner of the video’s thumbnail, tap on the thumbnail itself to open the video editor. You will be able to trim the clip or add a drawing/text/sticker (brush icon). You can even do some basic color correction (sliders icon), I kid you not! And you can adjust the video resolution by tapping on the gear icon in the bottom left corner of the tool box. By moving the slider you can choose between FHD 1920×1080, HD 1280×720, SD 854×480 and what I will call “LD” (low definition) 480×270.

If your primary focus when using messenger apps is most comprehensive security / data protection or mass compatibility and you don’t need to use the app as a tool for direct (video) file transfer, then you might still prefer Signal, Threema or WhatsApp respectively. Otherwise Telegram is a powerful tool with best-in-class features for a professional video production workflow. 

So despite the fact that Telegram is still far from being as ubiquitous as WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger, it has significantly increased its user base in the last months and years (currently over half a billion installs from the Google Play Store!) and chances are getting better that the person sending video to you is using it or has at least installed it on her/his phone.

Questions and comments are welcome, either below in the comment section or on Twitter @smartfilming. I also just created my own Telegram channel which you can join here: https://t.me/smartfilming.

Download Telegram for Android on the Google Play Store.

Download Telegram for iOS on the Apple AppStore.

Download Telegram for Windows 10 Mobile / WindowsPhone on the Microsoft Store.