smartfilming

Erkundet die Möglichkeiten für Videoproduktion mit Smartphone & Tablet

#7 The cheapest Android phone with relevant pro video specs? — 10. July 2017

#7 The cheapest Android phone with relevant pro video specs?

The Nextbit Robin

I’ve been spending quite some time in the last months doing research on what device could qualify as the cheapest budget Android phone that still has certain relevant pro specs for doing mobile video. While it might be up to discussion what specs are the most important (depending on who you ask), I have defined the following for my purposes: 1) decent camera that can record at least in FHD/1080p resolution, 2) proper Camera2 API support to run pro camera apps with manual controls like Filmic Pro (check out my last post about what Camera2 API is), 3) powerful enough chipset that allows the use of video layers in pro video editing apps like KineMaster and PowerDirector, 4) support for external microphones (preferably featuring a headphone jack as long as there are no good all-wireless solutions available).

The greatest obstacle in this turned out to be No. 2 on the list, proper Camera2 API support. Apart from Google’s (abandoned?) Nexus line which also includes a budget option with the Nexus 5X (currently retailing for around 250€), phone makers (so far) have only equipped their flagship phones with adequate Camera2 API support (meaning the hardware support level is either ‘Full’ or ‘Level 3’) while mid-range and entry-level devices are left behind.

Recently, I happened to come across a rather exotic Android phone, the Nextbit Robin. The Nextbit Robin is a crowdfunded phone that came out last year. Its most notable special feature was the included 100GB of cloud storage on top of the 32GB internal storage. While the crowdfunding campaign itself was successful and the phone was actually released, regular sales apparently have been somewhat underwhelming as the phone’s price has dropped significantly. Originally selling for a mid-range price of 399$, it can now be snagged for around 150€ online (Amazon US even has it for 129$). As far as I know, it is now the cheapest Android device that checks all the aforementioned boxes regarding pro video features, INCLUDING full Camera2 API support! Sure, it has some shortcomings like mediocre battery life (the battery is also non-replaceable – but that’s unfortunately all too common these days) and the lack of a microSD storage option (would have been more useful than the cloud thing). It also gets warm relatively quick and it’s not the most rugged phone out there. But it does have a lot going for it otherwise: The camera appears to be reasonably good (of course not in the same league as the ones from Samsung’s or LG’s latest flagships), it even records video in UHD/4K – though it’s no low light champion. The Robin’s chipset is the Snapdragon 808 which has aged a bit but in combination with 3GB of RAM, it’s still a quite capable representative of Qualcomm’s 800-series and powerful enough to handle FHD video layers in editing apps like KineMaster and PowerDirector which is essential if you want to do any kind of a/b-roll editing on your video project. It also features a 3.5mm headphone jack which makes it easy to use external microphones when recording video with apps that support external mics. The most surprising thing however is that Nextbit implemented full Camera2 API support in its version of Android which means it can run Filmic Pro (quite well, too, from what I can tell so far!) and other advanced video recording apps like Lumio Cam and Cinema 4K with full manual controls like focus, shutter speed & ISO. One more thing: The Robin’s Android version is pretty much as up-to-date as it gets: While it has Android 6 Marshmallow out of the box, you can upgrade to 7.1.1 Nougat (the latest version is 7.1.2).

So should you buy it? If you don’t mind shelling out big bucks for one of the latest Android flagship phones and you really want the best camera and fastest chipset currently available, then maybe no. But if you are looking for an incredible deal that gives you a phone with a solid camera and a whole bunch of pro video specs at a super-low price, then look no further – you won’t find that kind of package for less at the moment.

Advertisements
#6 What the hell is Camera2 API and why should I know about it? — 17. June 2017

#6 What the hell is Camera2 API and why should I know about it?

 

Manual controls for exposure and focus in Filmic Pro V6 (current Android beta version).

This blog post is trying to shed some light into one of Android’s fragmentation corners – one that’s mainly relevant for people interested in more advanced photography and videography apps to take manual control over their image composition.

First off, I have to say that I’m not a coder / software expert at all so this comes from a layman’s point of view and I will – for obvious reasons – not dig too deep into the more technical aspects underneath the surface.

Now, what is an API? API stands for „application programming interface“. An operating system uses APIs to give (third party) developers tools and access to certain parts of the system to use them for their application. In reverse, this means that the maker of the operating system can also restrict access to certain parts of the system. To quote from Wikipedia: „In general terms, it is a set of clearly defined methods of communication between various software components. A good API makes it easier to develop a computer program by providing all the building blocks, which are then put together by the programmer.“ Now you know it.

Up to version 4.4 (KitKat) of Android, the standard API to access the camera functionality embedded in the OS was very limited. With version 5 (Lollipop), Google introduced the so-called Camera2 API to give camera app developers better access to more advanced controls of the camera, like manual exposure (ISO, shutter speed), focus, RAW capture etc. While the phone makers themselves are not necessarily fully dependent on Google’s new API, because they can customize their own version of the Android OS, third party app developers are to a large extend – they can only work with the tools they are given.

So does every Android device running Lollipop have the new Camera 2 API? Yes and no. While Camera2 API is the new standard Camera API since Android Lollipop, there are different levels of implementation of this API which vary between different phone makers and devices. There are four different levels of Camera2 implementation: Legacy, Limited, Full and Level 3. ‚Legacy‘ means that only the features from the old Camera1 API are available, ‚Limited‘ means that some features of the new API are available, ‚Full‘ means that all basic new features of Camera2 are available and ‚Level 3‘ adds some bonus features like RAW capture on top of that.

From the official Android documentation for developers.

Depending on the level of implementation, you can use those features in advanced image capturing apps – or not. An app like Filmic Pro can only be installed if the Camera2 support level is at least ‚Full‘ – otherwise you can only install the less feature-packed Filmic Plus. Lumio Cam on the other hand can be installed on most devices but you can only activate the pro mode with manual exposure and focus if the support level is at least ‚Full‘ again. So if you’re interested in using advanced third party apps for capturing photos or recording video with manual exposure controls etc. you want to have a device that at least has ‚Full‘ Camera2 API support.

But what devices have ‚Full‘ Camera2 support? Currently there are two main categories: Google hardware (phones) and (many/most) flagship phones that were released after Android Lollipop came out. Actually, it seems that the latter really only got going with Android 6 Marshmallow (I guess phone makers needed some time to figure out what this was all about ;)) It doesn’t come as a surprise that Google gives their own devices full support (Nexus & Pixel lines). That means even an almost ancient, pre-Lollipop device like the original Nexus 5 has received full support in the meantime (via OS update). Of course all Nexus phones after that (Nexus 6, Nexus 5X, Nexus 6P) are included and it goes without saying Google’s Pixel phones as well.

Now let’s head over to other smartphone manufacturers (so-called OEMs, Original Equipment Manufacturers) like Samsung, LG, HTC, Huawei, Sony, Lenovo/Motorola, OnePlus etc. Many of them offer at least the crucial ‚Full‘ support level on their flagships that came out with Android 6 Marshmallow installed, some already on the ones that came out with Android 5 Lollipop: Samsung with it’s S-series (S6, S6 Edge, S6 Edge Plus via update, S7, S7 Edge etc.), LG with its G-series (starting with the G4) and V-series (starting with the V10), HTC (starting with the HTC 10), Lenovo/Motorola (starting with the Moto Z), OnePlus (starting with the OnePlus 3/3T), and Sony (starting with the Xperia Z5 via update as far as I know). Sony however is a special case: Their Xperia series has been blacklisted by the developers of FilmicPro/Plus because of major issues that occurred with their devices – you can’t install their apps on a Sony phone at the moment. On the other hand, there are also a few major smartphone OEMs that yet have to offer full Camera2 support for their flagships, the most prominent black sheep being Huawei with its P & Mate series, even the brand new Huawei P10 with all its camera prowess has only limited support. The same goes – unsurprisingly – for Huawei’s budget brand Honor. Other OEMs that don’t offer full Camera2 support in their flagships include Asus (Zenfone 3) and Blackberry (KeyOne). Let’s hope that they will soon add this support and let’s also hope that proper support trickles down to the mid-range and maybe even entry-level phones of the Android universe.

Are you curious what Camera2 support level your phone has? You can use two different apps (both free) on the Google Play Store to test the level of Camera2 implementation on your device. Camera2 probe & Camera2 Probe.

You can also find a (naturally incomplete) list of Android devices and their level of Camera2 API support here, created and maintained by the developer of the app „Camera2 probe“:

https://github.com/TobiasWeis/android-camera2probe/wiki

If you have a device that is not listed, you can help expanding the list by sending your device’s results (no personal data though) to the developer (there’s a special button at the bottom of the app).

For more in-depth information about Camera2 API, check out these sources:

https://spectrastudy.com/camera2-api-on-mwc-2015-devices/

https://developer.android.com/reference/android/hardware/camera2/package-summary.html

If you have questions or comments, feel free to get in touch!

#4 “Insta360 Air”: 360°-Kamera für Android-Smartphones — 14. March 2017

#4 “Insta360 Air”: 360°-Kamera für Android-Smartphones

Die Firma Insta360 hatte bereits vor einigen Monaten eine 360°-Aufsteckkamera für iPhones (Insta360 Nano) herausgebracht, nach einer erfolgreichen Crowdfunding-Kampagne auf IndieGoGo dürfen sich mit der Insta360 Air nun auch viele Besitzer eines Android-Smartphones über einen recht kostengünstigen Einstieg in die langsam an Fahrt gewinnende Welt der 360°-Kameras freuen.

Im Gegensatz zu eigenständigen 360°-Kameras wie der Ricoh Theta S, der LG 360 Cam oder der Samsung Gear 360 (die zwar jeweils auch immer über eine Companion-App zur besseren Kontrolle verfügen, jedoch zur Not auch ohne diese funktionieren)  kann die Insta360 Air nur zusammen mit einem Android-Smartphone oder per Adapter als Web-Cam an einem Rechner betrieben werden. Sie verfügt weder über einen internen Speicher noch über eine eigene Stromversorgung. Die Insta360 Air besitzt je nach gewähltem Modell einen Anschluss vom Typ Micro-USB oder USB-C. Letzterer wird gerade zunehmend als neuer Verbindungs-Standard etabliert, die allermeisten Android-Geräte im Umlauf besitzen jedoch derzeit noch einen Micro-USB-Anschluss. Die Insta360 Air steckt in einer Schutzhülle aus Gummi, die sich gut um die Kamera schmiegt und die Linsen vor Kratzern bewahrt, wenn man die Kamera transportiert. 

Bevor es losgeht, muss man sich auf jeden Fall noch die Insta360 Air-App aus dem PlayStore herunterladen, um die Kamera zu bedienen. Die Kamera wird direkt auf den jeweiligen USB-Anschluss des Smartphones gesteckt und bietet einem im Aufnahme-Modus drei Optionen: Foto, Video und Video-Livestreaming (z.B. über YouTube). Die aufgenommenen Videos und Fotos werden direkt auf dem Smartphone gespeichert und müssen nicht erst wie bei anderen 360°-Kameras per WiFi übertragen werden. Hier gibt es aber bereits einen ersten gravierenden Kritikpunkt: Die App erlaubt es derzeit noch nicht, Inhalte auf einen externen Speicher (also eine microSD-Karte) zu schreiben, gerade das aber ist ja einer der Vorteile von Android gegenüber iOS. Und speziell bei so speicherintensiven Dateien wie 360-Videos oder -Fotos stößt man dann schnell auf Probleme, wenn einem nur der interne Speicher zur Verfügung steht. Die Entwickler haben jedoch angekündigt, dass die Funktion des Speicherns auf externe SD-Karten per Update noch nachgereicht wird. [NACHTRAG: Mit dem App-Update vom 21. März 2017 ist es nun auch möglich, Aufnahmen direkt auf einer externen SD-Karte für speichern. Falls die Schreibgeschwindigkeit der verwendeten Karte jedoch unzureichend ist, kann es zu Leistungsproblemen kommen.]

Dass man Videos und Fotos gleich direkt auf dem Smartphone hat, ist natürlich insbesondere auch deshalb hilfreich, da das Material bei Bedarf gleich über soziale Netzwerke geteilt werden kann. Man sollte jedoch dabei beachten, dass nicht alle verfügbaren Teil-Optionen tatsächlich die Datei versenden oder direkt die gewünschte Plattform nutzen: Während z.B. YouTube (für Videos) und Facebook (Fotos und Videos) mit interaktiven 360°-Dateien korrekt umgehen können, unterstützen andere Plattformen wie WhatsApp, Instagram oder Twitter interaktives 360°-Material (noch) nicht nativ. Stattdessen wird das Video oder Foto auf die Seite von Insta360 geladen und ein Link generiert, der dann über die entsprechenden Dienste versendet werden kann. Der Empfänger folgt dem Link, um das Foto oder Video im interaktiven Format anzuschauen. Natürlich liegt das Problem grundsätzlich nicht bei Insta360, sondern bei den Plattformen selbst, da diese erst die entsprechende Infrastruktur in ihrem Netz zur Verfügung stellen müssten. Insta360 präsentiert deshalb eine Notlösung, aber wer sein Material nicht auf deren Server wissen will, der sollte auf bestimmte Teiloptionen verzichten, auch wenn es zunächst danach aussieht, als könnte man die Datei direkt über die gewünschte Plattform teilen. Es besteht allerdings alternativ die Möglichkeit, das Video oder Foto in einem anderen, nicht-interaktiven Format (“Little Planet”) direkt zu versenden, ohne den Umweg über die Seite von Insta360 zu gehen. Ein Manko bleibt dagegen leider, dass die Teilen-Funktion anscheinend nicht auf installierte Dateitransfer-Apps wie z.B. SendAnywhere zugreift, damit man die Datei gegebenenfalls schnell und bequem über WiFi an einen Rechner schicken kann, um dort mit ihr weiterzuarbeiten. Man muss dazu erst umständlich die Datei in die Galerie exportieren (da die Dateien zunächst alle intern in der App und nicht in der Android-Galerie gespeichert werden) und kann sie von dort aus über SendAnywhere oder eine ähnliche App versenden. Allgemein wäre es nach dem Aufnehmen von Videos auch noch sehr hilfreich, wenn man zumindest eine simple Trimfunktion zur Videobearbeitung hätte, um unerwünschte Teile am Beginn oder am Ende herauszuschneiden, bevor man das Video teilt. Auch das haben die Entwickler allerdings für ein zukünftiges Update der App zugesagt. Immerhin gibt es für Android bereits zwei durchaus brauchbare Videoschnitt-Apps für 360°-Videos, mit denen sich das Material der Insta360 Air nach erfolgtem Export in die Galerie bearbeiten lässt. Beide Apps befinden sich allerdings noch in der Beta-Phase, können aber trotzdem schon aus dem PlayStore geladen werden: “Collect” und “V360”.

Was die Bildqualität angeht, so schlägt sich die Insta360 Air für den günstigen Preis (im Rahmen der IndieGoGo-Kampagne 99 US-Dollar, im offenen Verkauf nun um die 150€) wirklich respektabel. Klar kann sie nicht mit hochwertigeren Kameras wie Samsungs Gear 360, Nikons Keymission 360 oder gar einem GoPro-Omni-Rig mithalten, aber diese kosten nun einmal auch wesentlich mehr (wobei die Gear 360 zuletzt stark im Preis gefallen ist). Mit den (immer noch teureren) Einsteiger-360°-Kameras von Ricoh und LG ist die Insta360 Air jedoch auf Augenhöhe, zumindest im Video-Bereich. Während die etwa 3x so teure Ricoh Theta S in Sachen Fotoauflösung zwar deutlich im Vorteil ist (max. 5376 x 2688 vs. 3008 x 1506 Pixel), geht die Insta360 Air beim Video (max. 2560 x 1280 vs. 1920 x 1080 – einige wenige Android-Modelle sollen sogar eine noch etwas höhere Videoauflösung ermöglichen) sogar als Sieger hervor. Es gab allerdings auch ein paar Fälle, in denen im Video kleinere Fragmente/Bildstörungen auftauchten. Bei Gelegenheit werde ich demnächst noch ein paar Samples verlinken oder einbetten.

Je nachdem, für welchen Zweck und in welcher Situation man eine 360°-Kamera einsetzt, ist die direkte Verbindung der Insta360 Air via eines Steckers mit dem Smartphone eher von Vorteil oder Nachteil gegenüber eigenständigen Kameras wie der Theta S, der LG Cam 360 oder der Gear 360, die man per WiFi vom Smartphone aus fernsteuert, ohne dass diese über einen Stecker miteinander verbunden sind. Wer hauptsächlich im “Selfie-Style” produzieren will, also Material, in dem man auch selbst im Bild zu sehen ist, für den ist die Insta360 Air genau richtig. Wer dagegen hauptsächlich Inhalte produzieren will, bei denen er selbst nicht im Bild zu sehen ist und trotzdem ständig die Kontrolle über das Bild hat, der ist mit einer eigenständigen 360°-Kamera inklusive WiFi-Steuerung besser bedient.

Die manuellen Einstellmöglichkeiten des Bildes über die App sind sehr begrenzt und orientieren sich eher am Socialmedia-Nutzer mit Fun-Faktor als am Video- oder Fotoprofi, was aber angesichts der Zielgruppe dieses Produktes ja auch völlig ok ist. Die Übersichtlichkeit der Optionen ist für Neulinge wahrscheinlich sogar eher ein willkommener Vorteil, da man schnell und einfach damit zurecht kommt. Im Foto-Modus gibt es zahlreiche Live-Filter, einen Timer für die Selbstauslösung sowie die Möglichkeit, den Belichtungswert nach oben oder unten zu ändern (allerdings keine ISO-Werte oder Verschlusszeiten). Im Video-Modus gibt es ebenfalls Live-Filter, einfache Belichtungskorrektur sowie die Möglichkeit, eine von zwei Videoauflösungen (2560×1280 oder 1920×960) zu wählen. Im Livestreaming-Modus lässt sich schließlich die Streaming-Platform, die Bitrate und die Auflösung wählen. Farbbalance/Weißabgleich läuft in allen Modi automatisch und kann nicht beeinflusst werden.

Positiv ist hervorzuheben, dass die Benutzung eines externen Mikrofons (z.B. eines smartLavs von Rode) über die 3,5mm-Klinke möglich ist, da die App dann diesen Audio-Input automatisch anzapft. Der Ton eines Videos ist prinzipiell eine wichtige Sache (soweit der Fokus nicht auf einer untertitelte und/oder “stummen” Version für SocialMedia liegt) und deshalb ist die Option für die Verwendung eines externen Mikros sehr willkommen. Benutzt man kein externes Mikro, dann hatte ich beim Ton öfter einmal kleinere Aussetzer während des Videos. Solange man nur unspektakuläre Umgebungsgeräusche hat, ist das nicht übermäßig problematisch. Wer jedoch etwas live zum Video erzählt, der bevorzugt sicher einen saubereren Ton.

Insgesamt lässt sich auf jeden Fall sagen, dass die App von der Benutzeroberfläche her sehr intuitiv und schick gestaltet ist. Allerdings muss an dieser Stelle nun auch das mit Abstand größte Problem benannt werden, dass sich mir bei der Benutzung der Insta360 Air offenbarte und das für jede Menge Frust sorgte: Die Zuverlässigkeit und Stabilität der App lässt (noch) sehr zu wünschen übrig – zumindest war das bei meinen drei Android-Test-Geräten zu beobachten. Fairerweise muss gesagt werden, dass eigentlich nur zwei davon wirklich zählen, da das Sony Xperia M2 mit seinem Snapdragon 400 SoC (System-on-a-Chip) nicht die Anforderungen an die Hardware erfüllt, die Insta360 selbst vorgibt. Genauere Informationen zu den mit der Insta360 Air kompatiblen Android-Geräten finden sich hier auf der Seite von Insta360 und sollten UNBEDINGT konsultiert werden, bevor man sich die Kamera kauft! Als offiziell kompatible Testgeräte blieben mir deshalb ein LG V10 (mit Snapdragon 808 und Android Marshmallow) sowie ein Lenovo Moto G4 Plus (mit Snapdragon 617 und Android Nougat). Leider stellte sich schnell heraus, dass die App zur Bedienung der Insta360 Air sehr häufig hängen bleibt, abstürzt oder Fehlermeldungen produziert. Während man mit dem V10 immerhin noch eine Chance von gefühlten 50% hat, dass die App funktioniert, scheint es beim G4 Plus ein reines Glücksspiel zu sein und die App funktioniert weitaus häufiger nicht als dass sie funktioniert. Die Tatsache, dass das Ganze mit dem V10 immerhin wesentlich besser klappt (wenn auch keineswegs gut), legt die Vermutung nahe, dass die Leistungsfähigkeit des Chipsets eine Rolle spielt. 360°-Videos verlangen dem Chip eine Menge Rechenleistung ab und es scheint mir durchaus möglich, dass die Insta360 Air bzw. die App bei  Smartphones mit den neuesten Top-Chips von Qualcomm (Snapdragon 820/821/835) oder einem entsprechenden Äquivalent (z.B. Samsungs Exynos 8890 im S7/S7 Edge) wesentlich besser, vielleicht sogar prinzipiell absolut zuverlässig funktionieren. Der Snapdragon 808 des V10 war zwar schon bei der Veröffentlichung des Gerätes nur der zweitleistungsfähigste Chip von Qualcomm (LG traute dem eigentlichen Top-Chip 810 wegen diverser Überhitzungsprobleme in anderen Geräten nicht recht und verbaute deshalb den SD 808), doch wenn selbst die 600er-Serie von Insta360 noch offiziell als kompatibel ausgegeben wird, hätte ich mir schon eine weitaus zuverlässigere Performance im Zusammenspiel mit dem Snapdragon 808 erwartet.  Andererseits kann es natürlich auch sein, dass die App noch nicht vollkommen ausgereift oder optimiert ist. Für Letzteres könnte sprechen, dass die Probleme oft schon beim Starten der Kamerafunktion auftreten, noch bevor die Aufnahme überhaupt begonnen wurde. Möglicherweise beansprucht aber auch die Vorschau den Prozessor bereits dermaßen stark, dass sich weniger starke Chipsets daran “verschlucken”. Mitunter kommt es auch vor, dass die App zwar normal läuft, die Verbindung zur Kamera jedoch plötzlich abbricht und eine Fehlermeldung erscheint. Wenn man mit der Kamera einfach nur ungezwungen herumspielen will, dann nimmt man die Schwierigkeiten vielleicht noch locker und freut sich einfach über die guten Ergebnisse, wenn es klappt. Auch macht die Verwendung der Insta360 Air grundsätzlich eine Menge Spaß. Wer aber darauf baut, dass er sich zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt auf die Kamera verlassen können muss, der sollte genügend Zeit für Stoßgebete an den Technikgott oder gute Nerven mitbringen. [NACHTRAG: Ich habe festgestellt, dass die App wesentlich zuverlässiger funktioniert, wenn man die Kamera erst ganz am Ende nach dem Aktivieren der Live-Vorschau in der App auf das Smartphone steckt und nicht schon vorher. Prinzipiell kann man sie jedoch auch vor dem Öffnen der App verbinden, die App wird dann automatisch gestartet.]

Abschließend lässt sich sagen: Wenn sie funktioniert, dann ist sie super! Die Insta360 Air ist ein cooles Gadget, das für viele ein kostengünstiger Einstieg in die spannende Welt der 360°-Videos und -Fotos sein kann und für den Preis eine erstaunliche Qualität (vor allem im Video-Bereich) bietet. Auch die App ist vom Design her gut gelungen. Neben einigen fehlenden Features wie z.B. der Möglichkeit, Videos und Fotos auf die externe SD-Karte des Smartphones zu schreiben oder Videos zu schneiden (die wohl noch mit Updates nachgeliefert werden) ist das gravierendste Problem die fehlende Stabilität und Zuverlässigkeit der App im Zusammenspiel mit der Kamera – zumindest was die Tests mit meinen zwei Testgeräten, dem LG V10 und dem Lenovo Moto G4 Plus, angeht. Es bleibt die Hoffnung, dass das App-Kamera-Tandem bei noch leistungsfähigeren Smartphones wesentlich besser funktioniert oder – das wäre natürlich die bessere Variante – das Zusammenspiel durch App- oder Firmware-Updates so optimiert werden kann, dass man die Insta360 Air auch mit Geräten unterhalb der absoluten Flaggschiff-Klasse zuverlässig nutzen kann.