smartfilming

Exploring the possibilities of video production with smartphones

#52 How YouTube started p****** me off… — 18. February 2022

#52 How YouTube started p****** me off…

We all love YouTube, it’s become the favorite “TV channel” of many and its value as a communal video archive shouldn’t be underestimated. However, not all that glitters is gold. I’m not talking about the considerable amount of trash content that just wastes your time or even worse, spreads misinformation. No, I’m talking about something else. Fairly recently I noticed something really annoying. First I thought it was some kind of mistake or bug, but no…

READ ON
#50 Anniversary Post: 50 Voices of Phoneography — 15. November 2021

#50 Anniversary Post: 50 Voices of Phoneography

The good thing about numbering your blog posts is that it’s easy to figure out when you have an anniversary coming up… 😉 And now’s the time! To be honest, I wasn’t really sure I would get that far when I started smartfilming.blog in the summer of 2015 with my first articles in German. I had made my initial steps in the blogosphere in 2009 writing about something completely different but discontinued the project two years later when I realized my interest in the topic was fading. Well, I have shown more stamina this time around: 6 years and 50 blog posts! (in case you want to check out an overview of the previous 49 click here) So what to do for this happy occasion?

Read On
#47 Videomakers please stop doing this! — 30. July 2021

#47 Videomakers please stop doing this!

Photo: SHVETS production / Pexels

Ok, today I have something a little different from the usual blog fare around here: a quick and dirty rant, maybe just a little bit tongue-in-cheek. I beg your pardon. I will only shame the deed, not name any perpetrators. You will probably have come across it and either noticed it consciously or subconsciously. Most likely on YouTube. There’s also a good chance you might disagree with what I am about to say. So be it. Now what am I talking about? 

Read On
#46 Top tips for smartphone videography in the summer — 28. June 2021

#46 Top tips for smartphone videography in the summer

Photo: Julia Volk via Pexels.com

It’s the dog days of summer again – well at least if you live in the northern hemisphere or near the equator. While many people will be happy to finally escape the long lockdown winter and are looking forward to meeting friends and family outside, intense sunlight and heat can also put extra stress on the body – and it makes for some obvious and less obvious challenges when doing videography. Here are some tips/ideas to tackle those challenges.

Read on
#45 The Smartphone Camera Exposure Paradox — 11. May 2021

#45 The Smartphone Camera Exposure Paradox

Ask anyone about the weaknesses of smartphone cameras and you will surely find that people often point towards a phone’s low-light capabilities as the or at least one of its Achilles heel(s). When you are outside during the day it’s relatively easy to shoot some good-looking footage with your mobile device, even with budget phones. Once it’s darker or you’re indoors, things get more difficult. The reason for this is essentially that the image sensors in smartphones are still pretty small compared to those in DSLMs/DLSRs or professional video/cinema cameras. Bigger sensors can collect more photons (light) and produce better low light images. A so-called “Full Frame” sensor in a DSLM like Sony’s Alpha 7-series has a surface area of 864 mm2, a common 1/2.5” smartphone image sensor has only 25 mm2. So why not just put a huge sensor in a smartphone?

Read On
#43 The Rode Wireless Go II review – Essential audio gear for everyone? — 20. April 2021

#43 The Rode Wireless Go II review – Essential audio gear for everyone?

Australian microphone maker RØDE is an interesting company. For a long time, the main thing they had going for them was that they would provide an almost-as-good but relatively low-cost alternative to high-end brands like Sennheiser or AKG and their established microphones, thereby “democratizing” decent audio gear for the masses. Over the last years however, Rode grew from “mimicking” products of other companies to a highly innovative force, creating original products which others now mimicked in return. Rode was first to come out with a dedicated quality smartphone lavalier microphone (smartLav+) for instance and in 2019, the Wireless GO established another new microphone category: the ultra-compact wireless system with an inbuilt mic on the TX unit. It worked right out of the box with DSLMs/DSLRs, via a TRS-to-TRRS or USB-C cable with smartphones and via a 3.5mm-to-XLR adapter with pro camcorders. The Wireless GO became an instant runaway success and there’s much to love about it – seemingly small details like the clamp that doubles as a cold shoe mount are plain ingenuity. The Interview GO accessory even turns it into a super light-weight handheld reporter mic and you are also able to use it like a more traditional wireless system with a lavalier mic that plugs into the 3.5mm jack of the transmitter. But it wasn’t perfect (how could it be as a first generation product?). The flimsy attachable wind-screen became sort of a running joke among GO users (I had my fair share of trouble with it) and many envied the ability of the similar Saramonic Blink 500 series (B2, B4, B6) to have two transmitters go into a single receiver – albeit without the ability for split channels. Personally, I also had occasional problems with interference when using it with an XLR adapter on bigger cameras and a Zoom H5 audio recorder.

Now Rode has launched a successor, the Wireless GO II. Is it the perfect compact wireless system this time around?

Read On
#36(0) The Insta360 One X2 – fun & frustration — 5. January 2021

#36(0) The Insta360 One X2 – fun & frustration

A couple of years ago, 360° (video) cameras burst onto the scene and seemed to be all the new rage for a while. The initial excitement faded relatively quickly however when producers realized that this kind of video didn’t really resonate as much as they thought it would with the public – at least in the form of immersive VR (Virtual Reality) content for which you need extra hardware, hardware that most didn’t bother to get or didn’t get hooked on. From a creator’s side, 360 video also involved some extra and – dare I say – fairly tedious workflow steps to deliver the final product (I have one word for you: stitching). That’s not to say that this extraordinary form of video doesn’t have value or vanished into total obscurity – it just didn’t become a mainstream trend. 

Among the companies that heavily invested in 360 cameras was Shenzen-based Insta360. They offered a wide variety of different devices: Some standalone, some that were meant to be physically connected to smartphones. I actually got the Insta360 Air for Android devices and while it was not a bad product at all and fun for a short while, the process of connecting it to the USB port of the phone when using it but then taking it off again when putting the phone back in your pocket or using it for other things quickly sucked out the motivation to keep using it.

Read On
#27 No, you don’t need a second video track for storytelling! (… and why it really doesn’t matter that much anymore) — 25. June 2020

#27 No, you don’t need a second video track for storytelling! (… and why it really doesn’t matter that much anymore)

As I pointed out in one of my very first blog posts here (in German), smartphone videography still comes with a whole bunch of limitations (although some of them are slowly but surely going away or have at least been mitigated). Yet one central aspect of the fascinating philosophy behind phoneography (that’s the term I now prefer for referring to content creation with smartphones in general) has always been one of “can do” instead of “can’t do” despite the shortcomings. The spirit of overcoming obvious obstacles, going the extra mile to get something done, trailblazing new forms of storytelling despite not having all the bells and whistles of a whole multi-device or multi-person production environment seems to be a key factor. With this in mind I always found it a bit irritating and slightly “treacherous” to this philosophy when people proclaimed that video editing apps without the ability to have a second video track in the editing timeline are not suitable for storytelling. “YOU HAVE TO HAVE A VIDEO EDITOR WITH AT LEAST TWO VIDEO TRACKS!” Bam! If you are just starting out creating your first videos you might easily be discouraged if you hear such a statement from a seasoned video producer. Now let me just make one thing clear before digging a little deeper: I’m not saying having two (or multiple) video tracks in a video editing app as opposed to just one isn’t useful. It most definitely is. It enables you to do things you can’t or can’t easily do otherwise. However, and I can’t stress this enough, it is by no means a prerequisite for phoneography storytelling – in my very humble opinion, that is.

Read On
#24 Why Telegram is the best messenger app for sending video files — 7. June 2020

#24 Why Telegram is the best messenger app for sending video files

Ever since smartphones and mobile internet became a thing, messenger apps have grown immensely in popularity and significantly curbed other types of (digital) communication like SMS/texts, eMails and heck yes, phone calls, for most of us. There’s also little doubt about which messenger apps can usually be found on everyone’s phone: WhatsApp is by far the most popular app of its kind on a global scale with only Facebook Messenger being somewhat close in terms of users. Sure, if you look at certain regions/countries or age groups you will find other prominent messenger apps like WeChat in China, KakaoTalk in Korea, Viber in the Ukraine or Snapchat among the younger generation(s). We have also seen a noticeable rise in the popularity of security and data conscious alternatives like the Edward Snowden-recommended Signal or Switzerland-based Threema. One might say that right in between mass popularity and special focus groups sits Telegram.

Read On
#14 “Shediting” or: How to edit video already while shooting on a smartphone — 17. May 2018

#14 “Shediting” or: How to edit video already while shooting on a smartphone

UI of Motorola’s native camera app (“MotoCam”) while recording video. Bottom right is the “pause” button that will let you pause the recording and resume it later if you don’t leave the app.

When using a headline like the one above, camera people usually refer to the idea that you should already think about the editing when shooting. This basically means two things: a) make sure you get a variety of different shots (wide shot, close-up, medium, special angle etc) that will allow you to tell a visually interesting story but b) don’t overshoot – don’t take 20 different takes of a shot or record a gazillion hours of footage because it will cost you valuable time to sift through all that footage afterwards. That’s all good advice but in this article I’m actually talking about something different, I’m talking about a way to create a video story with different shots while only using the camera app – no editing software! In a way, this is rather trivial but I’m always surprised how many people don’t know about it as this can be extremely helpful when things need to go super-fast. And let’s be honest, from mobile journalists to social media content producers, there’s an increasing number of jobs and situations to which this applies…

Continue reading

#3 Medienproduktion mit Smartphone & Tablet: CONTRA — 13. January 2017

#3 Medienproduktion mit Smartphone & Tablet: CONTRA

thumbs-down-circle

CONTRA – Was für Nachteile und Probleme kann es geben?

1. Kein optischer Zoom
Smartphones und Tablets können vieles, aber nicht alles. Ein zentraler Schwachpunkt gegenüber regulären (Video-)Kameras ist z.B. der fehlende optische Zoom, mit dem sich weit entfernte Motive näher heranbringen und schnelle/bequeme Einstellungswechsel vornehmen lassen. Kamera-Apps bieten mitunter einen digitalen Zoom an, dieser sollte jedoch im Normalfall nicht verwendet werden, da das Bild nur elektronisch vergrößert wird und die Bildqualität abnimmt. Samsung hat mit dem Galaxy S4 Zoom und dem K Zoom zwar zwei sehr interessante (von der Android-Software jedoch mittlerweile recht veraltete) Smartphones mit 10-fachem optischen Zoom auf den Markt gebracht, auch Asus hat mit dem ZenFone Zoom (3x) ein Experiment gewagt. Der Rest des Marktes muss jedoch (noch) ohne auskommen. Der Grund dafür ist recht simpel: Beim momentanen Stand der Technik würde ein optischer Zoom das Smartphone wesentlich dicker machen als es gerade en vogue ist. Für bestimmte Tätigkeiten ist der Zoom allerdings unablässig. So ist es z.B. bei der Aufzeichnung von Theaterstücken, Sportereignissen und anderen Events oft nicht möglich/gewünscht, für eine Nahaufnahme auf die Bühne oder das Spielfeld zu gehen. Doch auch wenn man die Möglichkeit hat, sich für Nahaufnahmen problemlos näher an ein Motiv zu begeben, ist der Zoom grundsätzlich eine bequemere und schnellere Lösung, was gerade für Journalisten, bei denen es oft auf Schnelligkeit ankommt, sehr von Vorteil sein kann. Aufgrund des fehlenden optischen Zooms muss man Personen mitunter auch sehr nah “auf die Pelle” rücken, um eine Nahaufnahme zu bekommen, was für diese unangenehm sein kann. Nun ist es zwar möglich, speziell für Smartphones entwickelte kleine Teleobjektive mittels einer Halterung vor die Smartphone-Linse zu bauen, dieses Prozedere ist aber nicht immer sehr praktikabel und funktioniert auch nicht mit allen Smartphones (gleich gut). Interessant ist jedoch ein neuer Ansatz mit zwei Kamera-Linsen in der Rückseite des Smartphones, die jeweils eine unterschiedliche Brennweite haben und damit als eine Art optischer Zoom dienen, wenn auch nur in sehr begrenztem Rahmen: Apples neues iPhone 7+ geht diesen Weg, ebenso Asus’ kommendes ZenFone 3 Zoom. Damit kann der Formfaktor des Handys flach gehalten werden, allerdings gibt es wegen der zwei Festbrennweiten (beim iPhone 7+ sind es 28 bzw. 56mm, also ein 2x Zoom) keine Zwischenwerte (also kein kontinuierliches Zoomen) und ein Zoom-Faktor von 2 ist auch nicht gerade weltbewegend.

Continue reading

#2 Medienproduktion mit Smartphone & Tablet: PRO — 29. July 2015

#2 Medienproduktion mit Smartphone & Tablet: PRO

IMG_0822

Technik bietet sich ja bekanntermaßen besonders dafür an, einer leicht irrationalen Faszination zu erliegen und die Dinge einfach nur wegen ihrer unglaublichen Möglichkeiten und Funktionen zu bestaunen – die Frage nach der tatsächlichen Nützlichkeit und Praktikabilität eines neuen Gadgets verschwimmt nicht selten in freudentränendurchnässten Funkelaugen. Im Bereich der Kunst kennt man die Redewendung des L’art pour l’art – der Kunst um der Kunst Willen, ohne eigentlichen praktischen Zweck. Nun ist aber das Smartphone, so wie wir es hier einordnen wollen, keine Kunst. Vielleicht ist das, was man damit kreiert Kunst, aber nicht das Gerät selber. Das Gerät ist vielmehr das Werkzeug, um etwas zu erschaffen (Kunst wäre eine Möglichkeit), und ein Werkzeug – darüber werden wir uns wohl leichter einig als beim Thema Kunstwerk – sollte dann doch irgendwie einen bestimmten Zweck erfüllen. Zudem darf die Frage angeschlossen werden, welchen Mehrwert ein neues Werkzeug gegenüber älteren, bereits existierenden hat. Und hier geht es dann auch schon konkret ans Eingemachte: Was für Vorteile bietet die Medienproduktion mit Smartphones und Tablets im Vergleich mit traditionelleren Gerätschaften wie dezidierten Aufnahme- und Bearbeitungsgeräten (Videokameras, Fotoapparate, Audiorekorder, Schnitt-PC etc.)? Und – das sollte ebenfalls Erwähnung finden – wo liegen die Schwachstellen? Eine hilfreiche Maxime in diesem Gebiet ist auf jeden Fall, dass man idealerweise immer das richtige Werkzeug für den entsprechenden Job hat – und das kann von Fall zu Fall variieren. Das Smartphone ist in vielerlei Hinsicht eine Art “digitales Schweizer Taschenmesser”, welches Unmengen an nützlichen Funktionen in sich vereint – aber ob ein Taschenmesser das beste Werkzeug dafür ist, die größte und gewaltigste Eiche im Wald zu fällen, mag eher bezweifelt werden. Monty Python würde es aber wohl sogar mit einem Hering schaffen. Ein Pro & Contra in zwei Teilen.

Continue reading

#1 Schnitt im Schritt oder: Die faszinierende Idee eines Hosentaschenvideostudios — 28. June 2015

#1 Schnitt im Schritt oder: Die faszinierende Idee eines Hosentaschenvideostudios

WP_20150628_13_08_32_Pro
iPod Touch (2. Generation) mit ReelDirector-App

Im Jahr 2009 kaufte ich mir für das Studium, bzw. genauer gesagt für meine neben dem Studium betriebenen Videoarbeiten meinen ersten iMac. Im Rahmen eines Back-to-School-Angebots gab es damals einen iPod Touch (2. Generation) gratis dazu, vermutlich weil die 3. Generation kurz vor dem Release stand und Apple die frisch veraltete Hardware noch irgendwie unters Volk bringen wollte. Das iPhone war zu diesem Zeitpunkt etwa 2 Jahre auf dem Markt, ich persönlich hatte daran allerdings kein sonderliches Interesse, vor allem der extrem hohe Preis für ein Mobiltelefon schreckte mich ab. Das mobile Internet war mir aus WAP-Zeiten noch etwas suspekt, der größte Reiz bestand damals für mich darin, unterwegs Filme zu schauen, die man sich auf das Geräte geladen hatte. Nun, das ließ sich auch mit meinem neu erworbenen iPod Touch bewerkstelligen, schließlich war dieser mehr oder weniger ein iPhone ohne Telefonfunktion. Nach einer kurzen „Wow“-Phase mit dem Hosentaschenkino landete das gute Teil jedoch recht schnell in einer Schublade, aus der ich es lediglich in sehr unregelmäßigen Abständen wieder hervorholte.

Continue reading